Intel Security chief warns IoT can open up new landscape of attack vectors for future hackers

The rapid evolution of cybercrime has brought about a 'big convergence' in the way cyberattacks are launched.

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While technology takes ever progressive steps into the future, so does cybercrime, which has undergone a rapid evolution. With the rise in connected devices, a new landscape of attack vectors can be opened up for future hackers.

Intel Security head Christopher Young told Bloomberg that it is "certainly not going to be outside the realm of possibility" in the future, for hackers to exploit IoT (Internet of Things) devices, to launch next-gen cyberattacks.

"We've noticed a big convergence in the way cyberattacks are happening," he said. Commenting on the advances in cybercrime tools, he pointed out how ransomware, which used to be previously thought of as "just a variant of malware" is now considered to be an "entire category of attack" in itself, which in the future can be linked to connected devices to unleash a new wave of cyberattacks.

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As an example, Young spoke of the possibility of hackers infecting autonomous connected cars with ransomware. "Let's say you get in your connected car in the morning and you get a pop-up that says 'if you pay me $300, I'll let you drive to work today'."

According to Intel Security, an average cyberattack costs around $640,000. However, the notable skills shortage in cybersecurity has become the primary issue in "hack response".

Young said: "We've known for a while that there's a shortage of cybersecurity talent." According to research conducted by the security firm into the security skills gap, nations across the world and not the just the US appear to be facing a shortage in cybersecurity workforce. He added that "western governments need to get involved in training the next wave of cybersecurity talent" so that the industry can attract "the men and women they need" to deal with the growing issues in the long term.

Intel Security head Christopher Young talks of the possibility of hackers infecting autonomous connected cars with ransomwareiStock

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